ESA’s space vision presented at Paris Peace Forum

ESA astronaut Claudie Haigneré attended the Paris Peace Forum this weekend, presenting the Agency’s vision for engaging humankind in multilateral cooperation for space exploration with peaceful objectives.

An initiative launched by President Macron of France, the Paris Peace Forum is an annual platform for global governance projects and was conceived as a response to tensions in the contemporary world. Taking place this year on 11-13 November, the centenary marking the end of the First World War, the event includes the attendance of over 60 international Heads of State.

Based on the belief that durable peace can only be achieved through international cooperation in several sectors, including space exploration, the Forum was an ideal opportunity to present ESA’s ‘Moon Village’ vision. This foresees a peaceful global cooperation to achieve a space landmark for humankind in 21st century, realising the potential of humankind as spacefaring species, while providing benefits and opportunities to as many people as possible on Earth.

Claudie Haigneré
Claudie Haigneré

Astronaut Claudie Haigneré said, “The question is not whether humankind will return to the Moon, but rather when and who. Our ‘Moon Village’ concept is an ambitious vision, a multi-partner open concept, it’s a step to engage all humankind, and not just separate nations, towards a component of its future.”

The Moon Village concept was introduced three years ago as a proposal for the post-International Space Station space programme. Over the last few years, plans to return to the Moon have gained interest and moved up the agendas of government, space agencies and private entrepreneurs.

A number of initiatives and missions are under way: from the US-led Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway and Chinese plans to explore the Moon, to European initiatives conducted through ESA. All these efforts converge towards a common goal: returning to and going forward to the Moon establishing a permanent presence.

But, although international in nature, these projects still replicate to some extent the ‘competitive approach’ of earlier ventures. They lack the global approach that would maximise results, allow wider participation, inspire younger generations and further mutual understanding and cooperation.

ESA has been working to promote this approach, also reaching out to non-space potential partners and other interested parties. This is the chance to rally the whole international community around a truly global vision where, through suitable governance mechanisms, any nation can be part of the effort regardless of their actual space capability.

Claudie Haigneré said, “Mobilised together towards this new step of humankind’s expansion, let us leave aside our national divisions and rivalries. As we move from our planet Earth, our cradle, let us grasp the opportunity to think differently in terms of multilateral cooperation, peaceful objectives, and respect for diverse interests and preservation of our common interests.

“We share the values that are promoted in this forum: respect, peaceful objectives with soft leadership and inclusiveness for inspiration. The spirit of the Moon Village is not taking part in a space race or competition, but an expression of cooperation, shared responsibility and sustainability.

“It not just a temporary adventure, or a nomadic exploration, but a true sustainable endeavour, with the wish to contribute in return to a better management of our planet Earth. We want to gather high-level political will to take this tremendous opportunity to think about the future of humankind on a new basis. The generations of the 21st century will be grateful for this fascinating endeavour.”

Claudie Haigneré and Piero Messina were accompanied by ESA Director General Jan Wörner with the support of ESA astronaut Frank De Winne, Head of the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany.

The United Nations/China Cooperation on the Utilization of the China Space Station

The First Announcement of Opportunity for Space Experiments on-board China Space Station

APPLY BY DOWNLOADING, COMPLETING AND SUBMITTING THE APPLICATION FORM . DEADLINE: 31 AUGUST 2018

IMPORTANT LINKS:

First Announcement of Opportunity (PDF Format, English)
Application Form (Word Format, English)
Handbook on China Space Station (PDF Format, English)

Leaflet for UN/China Cooperation on China Space Station

The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), in cooperation with the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA), is pleased to launch the “United Nations/China Cooperation on the Utilization of the China Space Station” programme under the framework of the UNOOSA’s Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI). Through this programme, UNOOSA intends to capitalize on the technological and innovative skills of the Government of China to benefit Member States of the United Nations, in particular developing countries, thereby contributing to the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through increasing access to space.

The programme is jointly implemented by UNOOSA and CMSA. It provides scientists from around the world with an opportunity to conduct their own experiments on board China’s Space Station (CSS). It is an innovative and future-focused programme to open up space exploration activities to all nations and to create a new paradigm in building capabilities in space science and technology.

The Announcement of Opportunity (AO) is the first invitation for scientific experiments on-board the CSS under the programme. The Handbook provides detailed technical information on the CSS and its resources for international cooperation. Applicants need to provide their proposal for space experiments and information on their team in the Application Form, which will be the mainstay for the preliminary selection.

SCOPE OF OPPORTUNITY

Through this Announcement of Opportunity, UNOOSA and CMSA have agreed to provide Member States of the United Nations with three types of opportunities:

Modality 1: Conducting experiments inside the CSS by utilizing experiment payloads developed by selected applicants.
Modality 2: Conducting experiments inside the CSS by utilizing experiment facilities already provided by China.
Modality 3: Conducting experiments outside the CSS by utilizing payloads developed by selected applicants.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

This opportunity is open to all Member States of the United Nations, with particular attention to developing countries. Public and private organizations with a scientific orientation and fundamental capabilities are eligible to apply. Two or more organizations from developed and developing countries are encouraged to submit a joint application(s). Applicants are responsible for the development of their projects.

APPLICATION SUBMISSION

The fully completed application form, including a signed and stamped endorsement page, must be submitted to UNOOSA by the deadline 31 August 2018 by email and post to the following contact:

c/o: Aimin Niu (Mr.)
United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs
United Nations Office at Vienna
Vienna International Centre
P.O. Box 500, A-1400 Vienna, Austria
Phone: (+43 1) 26060-4957
Fax: (+43 1) 26060-5830
Email: aimin.niu@un.org

Press release

United Nations and China invite applications to conduct experiments on-board China’s Space Station (28 May 2018)
United Nations and China agree to increased space cooperation (16 June 2016)

European Commission Space Programme

European Commission Space Programme, June 8th 2018

The European commission had proposed on Wednesday that the EU make a large rise in investment in its space programmes from €12bn over the last seven years to €16bn for 2021 to 2027.

–          Galileo i EGNOS9.7 bn,

–          Copernicus5.8 bn,

–          Safety programmes, €500 mil,

–          GOVSATCOM – civil defense,

–           SSA/SSTSpace Situational Awareness (SSA) / Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) .

Space programme

Addendum 1

Addendum 2

Addendum 3

Addendum 4

ESA Ice Cubes space research service open for business

ICE Cubes model

The first European facility for commercial research on the International Space Station was installed today in Europe’s space laboratory Columbus. The International Commercial Experiments service – ICE Cubes for short – offers fast, simple and affordable access for research and technology experiments in microgravity.

NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold installed the ice-box-sized facility in the European Physiology Module in the Columbus laboratory. ICE Cubes gets its power, temperature regulation and communications from Columbus.

The facility hosts experiments designed around 10 cm cubes (1U) or combinations of this volume – there is room for 12 cubes on top and two rows of four cubes below. Experiments can also float freely through the Columbus laboratory and communicate wirelessly with the facility to send data to Earth.

The first experiments are going to be launched on the next SpaceX Dragon supply vessel scheduled for launch this month. Designed to be plug-and-play, the experiment cubes only need to be slotted into the facility for them to work.

The first ICE Cubes experiments from the International Space University highlight the versatility of the service. One will investigate plant biology, another will bio-mine with microbes, and a third merges the arts and science by using a person’s heart rate to change a piece of kaleidoscopic artwork.

Get your space in space

Columbus laboratory

The ICE Cubes service is based on a partnership with Space Applications Services and is part of ESA’s human and robotic exploration strategy to ensure access to the weightless research possibilities in low Earth orbit.

From idea to reality in a year, anybody’s experiment can be launched to the Space Station. Service launches occur typically three times a year. With one point of contact and over two decades of space research know-how, getting an experiment designed, built and in compliance with International Space Station standards has never been easier.

The price starts from €50 000 for a 1-kg experiment with an end-to-end service package running for four months, with cheaper rates for educational organisations.

Stay connected
ICE Cubes control centre

ICE Cubes offers unprecedented 24-hour direct access to its experiments via a dedicated mission control centre at Space Applications Services’ premises in Sint-Stevens-Woluwe, Belgium. Clients can connect at any time to their experiment from their own location over internet to read the data and even send commands directly.

The experiments themselves will be highlighted on the ESA website over the next few weeks. Visit the ICE Cubes service website for more information and contact details.

The space industry is now 2% of Luxebourg’s GDP

Luxembourg, one of Europe’s smallest countries is gradually becoming a giant in the space industry.

With a population of just over 590.000, Luxemourg now generates nearly 2 percent of its annual GDP ($61 billion in 2016 ) from the space industry, according to Deputy Prime Minister Etienne Schneider.

Luxembourg’s sights are set on resources in space, and the country’s “space resources initiative” is plans to make the most out of a quickly growing global industry, Schneider says. “It’s a series of measures to position Luxembourg as the European heart of exploration and use of space resources.”

Space mining is Luxembourg’s present focus, but it is not the country’s first encounter with the space industry. In 1985, Luxembourg launched a public-private partnership with satellite builder SES. While Schneider said he believes the satellite business has not reached a negative trend, he does not anticipate the space industry growing beyond the 2 percent GDP mark any time soon.

You can read more about the Deputy Prime Minister’s comments via this link.