PERUN I – First Croatian Satellite

The first A3 project is construction, assembly and launching Croatian CubeSat 2U satellite with camera as the main payload. It was named after Perun, the god of thunder and lightning (the thunderbolt), the supreme deity in the pantheon of Slavic Gods, according to Slavic mythology. We took Perun as the name because the symbol of the God Perun is similar to our logo of the project.

PERUN project will be realized by a large number of young engineers and scientists led by experienced staff at universities and scientific institutions through project reviews and advice. Such engineers and scientists will not only learn the theory of space engineering but will get a welth of hands-on experience. Students who gain knowledge in aerospace often use it in other high technologies – biomedicine, mechanical engineering, software engineering…

The main misson is to take pictures from the Space at height of 550km. Taken images will be used for educational purposes and data will be avaliable for all institutions, universities and schools to learn how to use them. Also from this we want to initiate the first Croatian Space program.

Invest in our crowdfunding

Take part in the project by donating and that together we can reach the Space. Looking down from there on Earth you can say “I did it!”. Any small amount is welcome and shall make that vision come true. On our part we have highly skilled engineers and very enthusiastic young people and on your part means of acquiring technology that we still have to master. We call it science/technology and investemnet sinergy.

The Croatian satellite

To watch Croatia from Space one needs camera, source of energy, remote communication and very importantly control of camera orientation. It looks simple but all these is test of Croatian knowhow in high tech for the Space environment. Yes, and perservirance of young people to learn about what lies ahead in their lives, Space era. This project shall make us the member of the World Space Club.

Sponsors: Algebra d.o.o., Geolux d.o.o., Ruđer Bošković Institute, Digital Talents d.o.o., IJEX GmbH, Scam marine d.o.o., Internal d.o.o., ATIR d.o.o.

For more information visit Perun I webpage.

How can small countries find their role in space activities

This document is the result of the panel discussion on the topic “Small Countries in Space Era”, motivated by the rapidly evolving development in Space exploration, utilization of the benefits from it for the well being of humanity, and future presence of humans out there. Small countries should also find their role in this endeavor but in competition with large conglomerates the question is HOW?

 Preamble
A stable and prosperous society needs to be inventive in science and technology, and to be globally competitive. Two factors that determine success are  highlyeducated members of the community and leadership in new ideas. For a small country, with a reasonably educated population, it is therefore of utmost importance to recognize global trends in the field of science and technology and to focus their development efforts in this direction. Research and development in Space activities offer opportunities to small countries to participate as an active member. This primarily requires defining development strategies in the field of aerospace high technology industries, basic science and development, as well as activities in the field of space medicine, space law and space tourism.

Recommendations
The essential feature of Space programs is that it is interdisciplinary and  that it falls under the responsibilities of several ministries. Therefore, the first step towards commencing a Space program is setting up a Space Agency funded by the ministries of Science, Transport, Economy (where technology is incorporated) and Defense. The National Space Agency should ideally cover all sectors of Space program, with experts in respective fields.  The next step after establishing the Space Agency is to draft and adopt the National Space Strategy that would entail two principal segments

  1. National Space Program (Research, Technology and Applications)
  2. International contacts: ESA, EU, bilateral cooperation

Both of these segments form the basis for accession to the membership of the European Space Agency. The Space Strategy should encompass the long term and short-term development objectives and define the areas of priority.

The path to become a full member of ESA is to first sign the Framework Programme and then to become a co-operating state and thereby join the PECS (Plan for European Cooperating States) programme. The PECS Charter, which lasts for five years, enables the country to develop its space industry with ESA’s support. The next step is then the Associate Membership of ESA and lastly, the Full Membership of ESA. The National Space Agency would represent the country in the ESA council and programme boards. It would also advise the government on levels of commitment in the optional programmes of ESA in line with the space strategy. To support the creation of space start-up companies it is advisable to set up an ESA Business Incubation Centre (ESA-BIC).

In parallel, there should be a national space programme to prepare industry and academia for the competitive environment of ESA and EC contracts and to enable fruitful bi-lateral collaborations.

As a member of the European Union, the country also should participate in the down-stream space programme of the EU, which is implemented by the European Commission. Examples are Satellite Navigation (EGNOS and Galileo), Earth Observation (Copernicus), Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and the GOVSATCOM Programme.  To utilize the Public Regulated Service of Galileo Ministries of Interior and Defence should set up a Competent PRS Authority (CPA).

Prof. Dr. Slobodan Danko Bosanac
President
Adriatic Aerospace Association

The signatories to the document are:
Petr Bares, President, Czech Space Alliance
Prof. Dr. Sc. Slobodan Danko Bosanac, President, Adriatic Aerospace Association
Mag. Dr. Andreas Geisler, Appointed Head of the FFG Aeronautics and Space Agency.
Prof. Dr. Tomaž Rodič, Director, Slovenian Centre for Space Sciences and Technologies
Prof. Dr. Carsten Scharlemann, Head of Deparment, Aerospace Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt
Prof. Heinz Stoewer, Founder of Space Associates GmbH
Dr. Sc. Hrvoje Zorc, Adriatic Aerospace Association
Mag.iur. Anja Nakarada Pečujlić, Serbian Case for Space

Ethiopian Space Policy enacted by Ethiopia Cabinet of Ministers

Ethiopia has joined the league of African nations with Space policies after the nation’s cabinet of ministers enacts the Ethiopian Space Policy today December 22, 2018. This was confirmed by the Ethiopian Minister of Innovation and Technology, Dr. Eng. Getahun Mekuria. The policy would guide all activities of the country in the peaceful use of outer space especially on capitalizing on space technologies to tackle socio-economic challenges in the country.

During the cabinet meeting where the Ethiopian Space Policy was enacted into law. Photo Credit: @DrGetahun

Remember in October, Ethiopian Prime minister Abiy Ahmed approved a new ministerial portfolio with a record number of female ministers consisting 10 out of the 20 ministers, about 2 months later, this cabinet enacted Ethiopian Space Policy into law.

The history of interest in space science and technology in Ethiopia dates back to 2004 when three aspiring astronomers gathered a group of 47 space  enthusiasts to form the Ethiopian Space Science Society. The Society, which has recruited over 10,000 members since being launched in 2004, achieved the milestone of establishing East Africa’s only space observatory facility on the 3,200-metre hills of Entoto.

With work currently ongoing regarding the development of Ethiopian first satellite, the national space policy has been passed at the most appropriate time. Ethiopia joined other African countries like Nigeria, South Africa, Egypt, Morocco etc. who have national space policies.

Original article: https://africanews.space/ethiopian-space-policy-enacted-by-ethiopia-cabinet-of-ministers/

ESA’s space vision presented at Paris Peace Forum

ESA astronaut Claudie Haigneré attended the Paris Peace Forum this weekend, presenting the Agency’s vision for engaging humankind in multilateral cooperation for space exploration with peaceful objectives.

An initiative launched by President Macron of France, the Paris Peace Forum is an annual platform for global governance projects and was conceived as a response to tensions in the contemporary world. Taking place this year on 11-13 November, the centenary marking the end of the First World War, the event includes the attendance of over 60 international Heads of State.

Based on the belief that durable peace can only be achieved through international cooperation in several sectors, including space exploration, the Forum was an ideal opportunity to present ESA’s ‘Moon Village’ vision. This foresees a peaceful global cooperation to achieve a space landmark for humankind in 21st century, realising the potential of humankind as spacefaring species, while providing benefits and opportunities to as many people as possible on Earth.

Claudie Haigneré
Claudie Haigneré

Astronaut Claudie Haigneré said, “The question is not whether humankind will return to the Moon, but rather when and who. Our ‘Moon Village’ concept is an ambitious vision, a multi-partner open concept, it’s a step to engage all humankind, and not just separate nations, towards a component of its future.”

The Moon Village concept was introduced three years ago as a proposal for the post-International Space Station space programme. Over the last few years, plans to return to the Moon have gained interest and moved up the agendas of government, space agencies and private entrepreneurs.

A number of initiatives and missions are under way: from the US-led Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway and Chinese plans to explore the Moon, to European initiatives conducted through ESA. All these efforts converge towards a common goal: returning to and going forward to the Moon establishing a permanent presence.

But, although international in nature, these projects still replicate to some extent the ‘competitive approach’ of earlier ventures. They lack the global approach that would maximise results, allow wider participation, inspire younger generations and further mutual understanding and cooperation.

ESA has been working to promote this approach, also reaching out to non-space potential partners and other interested parties. This is the chance to rally the whole international community around a truly global vision where, through suitable governance mechanisms, any nation can be part of the effort regardless of their actual space capability.

Claudie Haigneré said, “Mobilised together towards this new step of humankind’s expansion, let us leave aside our national divisions and rivalries. As we move from our planet Earth, our cradle, let us grasp the opportunity to think differently in terms of multilateral cooperation, peaceful objectives, and respect for diverse interests and preservation of our common interests.

“We share the values that are promoted in this forum: respect, peaceful objectives with soft leadership and inclusiveness for inspiration. The spirit of the Moon Village is not taking part in a space race or competition, but an expression of cooperation, shared responsibility and sustainability.

“It not just a temporary adventure, or a nomadic exploration, but a true sustainable endeavour, with the wish to contribute in return to a better management of our planet Earth. We want to gather high-level political will to take this tremendous opportunity to think about the future of humankind on a new basis. The generations of the 21st century will be grateful for this fascinating endeavour.”

Claudie Haigneré and Piero Messina were accompanied by ESA Director General Jan Wörner with the support of ESA astronaut Frank De Winne, Head of the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany.

The United Nations/China Cooperation on the Utilization of the China Space Station

The First Announcement of Opportunity for Space Experiments on-board China Space Station

APPLY BY DOWNLOADING, COMPLETING AND SUBMITTING THE APPLICATION FORM . DEADLINE: 31 AUGUST 2018

IMPORTANT LINKS:

First Announcement of Opportunity (PDF Format, English)
Application Form (Word Format, English)
Handbook on China Space Station (PDF Format, English)

Leaflet for UN/China Cooperation on China Space Station

The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), in cooperation with the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA), is pleased to launch the “United Nations/China Cooperation on the Utilization of the China Space Station” programme under the framework of the UNOOSA’s Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI). Through this programme, UNOOSA intends to capitalize on the technological and innovative skills of the Government of China to benefit Member States of the United Nations, in particular developing countries, thereby contributing to the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through increasing access to space.

The programme is jointly implemented by UNOOSA and CMSA. It provides scientists from around the world with an opportunity to conduct their own experiments on board China’s Space Station (CSS). It is an innovative and future-focused programme to open up space exploration activities to all nations and to create a new paradigm in building capabilities in space science and technology.

The Announcement of Opportunity (AO) is the first invitation for scientific experiments on-board the CSS under the programme. The Handbook provides detailed technical information on the CSS and its resources for international cooperation. Applicants need to provide their proposal for space experiments and information on their team in the Application Form, which will be the mainstay for the preliminary selection.

SCOPE OF OPPORTUNITY

Through this Announcement of Opportunity, UNOOSA and CMSA have agreed to provide Member States of the United Nations with three types of opportunities:

Modality 1: Conducting experiments inside the CSS by utilizing experiment payloads developed by selected applicants.
Modality 2: Conducting experiments inside the CSS by utilizing experiment facilities already provided by China.
Modality 3: Conducting experiments outside the CSS by utilizing payloads developed by selected applicants.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

This opportunity is open to all Member States of the United Nations, with particular attention to developing countries. Public and private organizations with a scientific orientation and fundamental capabilities are eligible to apply. Two or more organizations from developed and developing countries are encouraged to submit a joint application(s). Applicants are responsible for the development of their projects.

APPLICATION SUBMISSION

The fully completed application form, including a signed and stamped endorsement page, must be submitted to UNOOSA by the deadline 31 August 2018 by email and post to the following contact:

c/o: Aimin Niu (Mr.)
United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs
United Nations Office at Vienna
Vienna International Centre
P.O. Box 500, A-1400 Vienna, Austria
Phone: (+43 1) 26060-4957
Fax: (+43 1) 26060-5830
Email: aimin.niu@un.org

Press release

United Nations and China invite applications to conduct experiments on-board China’s Space Station (28 May 2018)
United Nations and China agree to increased space cooperation (16 June 2016)

European Commission Space Programme

European Commission Space Programme, June 8th 2018

The European commission had proposed on Wednesday that the EU make a large rise in investment in its space programmes from €12bn over the last seven years to €16bn for 2021 to 2027.

–          Galileo i EGNOS9.7 bn,

–          Copernicus5.8 bn,

–          Safety programmes, €500 mil,

–          GOVSATCOM – civil defense,

–           SSA/SSTSpace Situational Awareness (SSA) / Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) .

Space programme

Addendum 1

Addendum 2

Addendum 3

Addendum 4