How can small countries find their role in space activities

This document is result of panel discussion on the topic “Small Countries in Space Era”, motivated by the rapidly evolving development in Space exploration, harnessing the benefits from it for the wellbeing of humanity and future presence of humans there. Small countries should also find their role in this endeavor but in competition with large conglomerates the question is HOW?

Preamble

A stable and prosperous society needs to be creative in science and technology, and to be globally competitive. Two factors that determine success are creatively educated members of the community and leadership in new ideas. For a small country, with a reasonably educated population, it is therefore of utmost importance to determine trends in the field of science and technology and to focus their development efforts in this direction. Research and development in Space activities offers opportunities to small countries to participate as an active member. This primarily requires defining strategic direction of development in the field of aerospace high technology industries, basic science and development as well as activities in the field of space medicine, space law and space tourism.

Recommendations

The essential trait of Space programs is interdisciplinary and cutting across the responsibilities of several ministries. Therefore, the basic step towards commencing a Space program is setting up a Space Agency by the funding ministries of Science, Transport, Economy (where technology is incorporated) and Defence. The National Space Agency should ideally cover all sectors of Space program, with experts in their fields. The follow up of establishing Space Agency is to set up a National Space Strategy that has two principal segments:
1. National Space Program (Research, Technology and Applications)
2. International contacts: ESA, EU, bilateral cooperation
Both these segments form the basis for accession to the membership of European Space Agency. The Space Strategy should encompass the long term and short-term development objectives and define the areas of priority.

The path to becoming a full member of ESA is to first sign a Framework Programme and then to become a co-operating state and thereby join the PECS (Plan for European Cooperating States) programme. The PECS Charter, which lasts for five years, shall enable the country to develop its space industry with ESA’s support. The next step is Associate Membership of ESA and lastly, Full Membership of ESA. The National Space Agency represents the country in the ESA council and programme boards. It also advises the government on levels of commitment in the optional programmes of ESA in line with the space strategy. To support the creation of space start-up companies it is advisable to set up an ESA Business Incubation Centre (ESA-BIC).

In parallel, there should be a national space programme to prepare industry and academia for the competitive environment of ESA and EC contracts and to enable fruitful bi-lateral collaborations. As a member of the European Union, the country also participates in the down-stream space programme of the EU, which is implemented by the European Commission. Examples are Satellite Navigation (EGNOS and Galileo), Earth Observation (Copernicus), Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and the GOVSATCOM Programme. To utilize the Public Regulated Service of Galileo Ministries of Interior and Defence should set up a Competent PRS Authority (CPA).

Institute Ruđer Bošković, Zagreb, Croatia, October 13, 2019

Prof. Dr. Slobodan Danko Bosanac
President of the Adriatic Aerospace Association

The signatories to the document are:
Petr Bares, President, Czech Space Alliance
Prof. Dr. Sc. Slobodan Danko Bosanac, President, Adriatic Aerospace Association
Mag. Dr. Andreas Geisler, Appointed Head of the FFG Aeronautics and Space Agency.
Prof. Dr. Tomaž Rodič, Director, Slovenian Centre for Space Sciences and Technologies
Prof. Dr. Carsten Scharlemann, Head of Deparment, Aerospace Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt
Prof. Heinz Stoewer, Founder of Space Associates GmbH
Dr. Sc. Hrvoje Zorc, Adriatic Aerospace Association

Adria Space Conference 2019

We are pleased to announce the 1st Adria Space Conference 2019 that is going to be held in Zagreb, Croatia on October 4th 2019.

Adria Space Conference 2019

Regional Cooperation on SpaceTechnology

Organizer:
Adriatic Aerospace Association (A3)
Ruđer Bošković Institute
University of Zadar

Sponsored by:
The Ministry of Economy, Entrepreneurship and Crafts of the Republic of Croatia

Chair: Slobodan Bosanac Ph.D., President of the A3

Adriatic Aerospace Conference is the organizer of the first regional meeting devoted to collaboration in space technologies. The goal of the Conference is to stimulate and strengthen the regional cooperation in research and development of advanced technologies, mainly used in space activities. The profile of the Conference is one-day meeting, where all participants will briefly report on their current activities and future programs. This should give push for further common developments in the field of nano-satellite technologies like construction, functions, propulsion, communication, attitude control, and similar. It is intended that the conference acquires annual character as a gathering of participants in space research and development in SE Europe.

More information on web page of the Conference.

Organizing Committee:

S. Bosanac, Ph.D., Adriatic Aerospace Association
M.Ivanda, Ph.D., Ruđer Bošković Institute
I. Jakić, CEO, IJEX GmbH
D. Kočiš, Adriatic Aerospace Association, World Space Week Croatia
I. Ljubić, Ph.D., Ruđer Bošković Institute
G. Verbanec, Ph.D., University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science,
H. Zorc, Ph.D., Adriatic Aerospace Association
S. Petrović,
D. Ramljak, Ph.D., Senior Science and Innovation Expert The World Bank

European Commission Space Programme

European Commission Space Programme, June 8th 2018

The European commission had proposed on Wednesday that the EU make a large rise in investment in its space programmes from €12bn over the last seven years to €16bn for 2021 to 2027.

–          Galileo i EGNOS9.7 bn,

–          Copernicus5.8 bn,

–          Safety programmes, €500 mil,

–          GOVSATCOM – civil defense,

–           SSA/SSTSpace Situational Awareness (SSA) / Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) .

Space programme

Addendum 1

Addendum 2

Addendum 3

Addendum 4

Russia, Kazakhstan and the UAE discuss collaboration in the space industry

During the trilateral meeting between the representatives of Russia, Kazakhstan and the UAE, the parties discussed opportunities for the improvement of joint investment projects in the space industry with application of high-tech innovation developments. The meeting was held within the framework of the XV International Aerospace Exhibition Dubai Air Show – 2017.

During the meeting, Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan (UAE) expressed interest in considering the possibility of the UAE participation in the joint Russian-Kazakhstan project Baiterek. The Baiterek Rocket and Space Complex set to launch in 2025, is a joint-venture project between Russia And Kazakhstan. The project is based on the existing infrastructure of the Zenit space and rocket complex at the Baikonur Cosmodrome and the Phoenix, the promising medium-range carrier rocket that will be created by Russia within the Federal Space Program starting in 2018. The Russian side will be responsible for creating a new carrier rocket and the Kazakh side is responsible for modernizing the Zenit’s existing launch and technical complexes.

In order to develop a further strategy and coordination of activities, an agreement was reached on the establishment of a tripartite working group for the development of joint projects in the space sector.

You can find more information on this topic via the following link.

The space industry is now 2% of Luxebourg’s GDP

Luxembourg, one of Europe’s smallest countries is gradually becoming a giant in the space industry.

With a population of just over 590.000, Luxemourg now generates nearly 2 percent of its annual GDP ($61 billion in 2016 ) from the space industry, according to Deputy Prime Minister Etienne Schneider.

Luxembourg’s sights are set on resources in space, and the country’s “space resources initiative” is plans to make the most out of a quickly growing global industry, Schneider says. “It’s a series of measures to position Luxembourg as the European heart of exploration and use of space resources.”

Space mining is Luxembourg’s present focus, but it is not the country’s first encounter with the space industry. In 1985, Luxembourg launched a public-private partnership with satellite builder SES. While Schneider said he believes the satellite business has not reached a negative trend, he does not anticipate the space industry growing beyond the 2 percent GDP mark any time soon.

You can read more about the Deputy Prime Minister’s comments via this link.